What do you want to see in 3D? It’s often said that sports content was the reason HDTV took off — home viewers were hooked the minute they found they could get up close to the action and see every blade of grass on the football field as the players collapsed in a tackle. The same may well hold true for 3D. If you were not only watching the game but felt like you were in the middle of it, the adrenaline rush could quickly become addictive.

It might not have been sports, but rather the success of 2009’s giant 3D box-office hit Avatar that made the film’s director, James Cameron, into a devoted fan of 3D. Now he and his special-effects partner Vince Pace are willing to bet they’ll be able to convince small-screen audiences that they can’t live without a 3D TV. They’ve launched a new venture, the Cameron-Pace Group, with the aim of enabling the creation of more 3D content specifically for television.

“Broadcasting is the future of 3D,” Cameron said in an article published in the Hollywood Reporter. And he is definitely bullish on this statement, because he went on to say that in two years, “everything will be produced in 3D and 2D versions will be extracted from that.”

Up to this point, 3D content has been limited mostly to animated movies and films made for giant-screen theaters such as IMAX. The limitations in availability of 3D production technology, combined with the immense expense of producing content in the format tended to scare broadcasters away. But the Cameron-Pace Group intends to change all of that by making its Fusion camera system, used to make Avatar, available to broadcasters.

This could be the discovery moment […]